Antidote combines a grammar corrector with rich dictionaries and language guides, all with direct integration into your writing software. Do you type in English or French? Then Antidote is for you! It works with Windows, Mac and Linux, while the dictionaries and guides are also available for iPhone and iPad.

Mastering the keyboard has become an essential skill. Learn to type or improve your keyboarding with Typing Pal. Using a test, Typing Pal initially evaluates your strengths and weaknesses before suggesting personalized exercises for you. Practice texts, dictation, games and statistics, it’s all there!

If your website leaves room for improvement, your readers are sure to be put off. To ensure quality, Druide has created WebElixir. WebElixir scans websites to detect errors in French and English, flag broken links and identify all changes. You receive a quality report after each scan.

Fiction, non-fiction, children’s literature and reference works; we are distinctly contemporary, offering our publications in print and digitally. Our authors—be they newcomers or veterans—have the same goals: to transport you, to move you, to make you think and to enrich your mind!

News

Reports

  • June 2019

    And/or is a common term in written English, particularly in legal, technical and journalistic texts. It is also widely criticized: the Chicago Manuel of Style warns writers to “Avoid this Janus-faced term.” Meanwhile, it has been described in courts of law as a “grammatical monstrosity”, a “bastard conjunction”, and worse. So why is and/or so controversial? And how did the term come about in the first place?

  • May 2019

    Although we humans are quite different from our fellow inhabitants of Earth, we can’t help but see a little bit of ourselves in them. Just look at how often we liken our own physical characteristics or personality traits to those of other creatures, or consider the number of animal-inspired words and expressions used to describe people.

  • April 2019

    Words like talented and glossy-paged represent a curious feature of English: adjectives that seemingly take the past participle verbal ending -ed, but that do not derive from verbs. Why can you say talented when there is no lexicalized verb to talent? Why does a glossy-paged book sound natural but a paged book, a concreted wall or a five-houred drive sound strange? 

Antidote 10

for Windows, Mac and Linux

Whether you’re writing an essay or an email, a simple click of a button will open some of the most comprehensive and useful language resources ever created.